presser foot shank

Michael Mackintosh Foot PC FRSL (23 July 1913 – 3 March 2010) was a British Labour Party politician and man of letters. Foot began his career as a journalist, becoming editor of Tribune on several occasions, and the Evening Standard newspaper at the age of just 28. He co-wrote the classic polemic against appeasement of Hitler, Guilty Men, under a pseudonym.
Foot became a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1945 to 1955 and served again from 1960 until he retired in 1992. A passionate orator and associated with the left-wing of the Labour Party for most of his career, Foot was an ardent supporter of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and British withdrawal from the European Economic Community. He was appointed to the Cabinet as Secretary of State for Employment under Harold Wilson in 1974, and he later served as Leader of the House of Commons under James Callaghan. He was also Deputy Leader of the Labour Party under Callaghan from 1976-80.
Foot was Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition from 1980 to 1983. His strongly left-wing political positions and criticisms of vacillating leadership made him an unpopular leader. Not particularly telegenic, he was also nicknamed “Worzel Gummidge” for his rumpled appearance. A right-wing faction of the party broke away to form the Social Democratic Party. Foot led Labour into the 1983 general election, when the party obtained its lowest share of the vote since the 1918 general election and the fewest parliamentary seats it had had at any time since before 1945. He resigned after the election.
Among the books he authored are Guilty Men, a biography of Jonathan Swift (The Pen and the Sword, 1957) and a biography of Aneurin Bevan.

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presser foot g

A walking ft . is a mechanism for feeding the workpiece by way of a sewing machine as it has been stitched. It really is most readily useful for sewing heavy materials where needle supply is mechanically limited, for spongy or padded materials where raising the feet out of connection with the material assists with the feeding action, and then for sewing many layers together in which a drop feed may cause the low layers to shift out of position with the top layers.
A sewing machine may have an individual walking feet, or two walking feet with alternating action. A walking feet may be coupled with another feed mechanism, like a drop feed or a needle feed.
It isn't a sewing machine connection for home use apart from for quilting, but this kind of supply is common in professional durable machines. Some home machines are sold as possessing a walking ft ., but already have a puller feed. However, virtually all home sewing machines use a typical connector for his or her presser foot, therefore add-on walking foot attachments can be found.

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presser foot organizer

Foot binding was the custom of applying tight binding to the feet of young girls to modify the shape of the foot. The practice possibly originated among upper-class court dancers during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period in Imperial China (10th or 11th century), then became popular among the elite during the Song dynasty and eventually spread to all social classes. Foot binding became popular as a means of displaying status (women from wealthy families, who did not need their feet to work, could afford to have them bound) and was correspondingly adopted as a symbol of beauty in Chinese culture. Its prevalence and practice however varied in different parts of the country. Feet altered by binding were called lotus feet.
It has been estimated that by the 19th century, 40–50% of all Chinese women may have had bound feet, and up to almost 100% among upper class Han Chinese women. The Manchu Kangxi Emperor tried to ban foot binding in 1664 but failed. In the later part of the 19th century, Chinese reformers challenged the practice but it was not until the early 20th century that foot binding began to die out as a result of anti-foot-binding campaigns. Foot-binding resulted in lifelong disabilities for most of its subjects, and a few elderly Chinese women still survive today with disabilities related to their bound feet.

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presser foot for quilting

Philippa Ruth Foot (; née Bosanquet; 3 October 1920 – 3 October 2010) was a British philosopher, most notable for her works in ethics. She was one of the founders of contemporary virtue ethics, inspired by the ethics of Aristotle. Her later career marked a significant change in view from her work in the 1950s and 1960s, and may be seen as an attempt to modernize Aristotelian ethical theory, to show that it is adaptable to a contemporary world view, and thus, that it could compete with such popular theories as modern deontological and utilitarian ethics. Some of her work was crucial in the re-emergence of normative ethics within analytic philosophy, especially her critique of consequentialism and of non-cognitivism. A familiar example is the continuing discussion of an example of hers referred to as the trolley problem. Foot's approach was influenced by the later work of Wittgenstein, although she rarely dealt explicitly with materials treated by him.

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